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Stylianos Pikis, Adomas Bunevicius, Cheng-Chia Lee, Huai-Che Yang, Brad E. Zacharia, Roman Liščák, Gabriela Simonova, Manjul Tripathi, Narendra Kumar, David Mathieu, Rémi Perron, Selcuk Peker, Yavuz Samanci, Jason Gurewitz, Kenneth Bernstein, Douglas Kondziolka, Ajay Niranjan, L. Dade Lunsford, Nikolaos Mantziaris, and Jason P. Sheehan

OBJECTIVE

As novel therapies improve survival for men with prostate cancer, intracranial metastatic disease has become more common. The purpose of this multicenter study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the management of intracranial prostate cancer metastases.

METHODS

Demographic data, primary tumor characteristics, SRS treatment parameters, and clinical and imaging follow-up data of patients from nine institutions treated with SRS from July 2005 to June 2020 for cerebral metastases from prostate carcinoma were collected and analyzed.

RESULTS

Forty-six patients were treated in 51 SRS procedures for 120 prostate cancer intracranial metastases. At SRS, the mean patient age was 68.04 ± 9.05 years, the mean time interval from prostate cancer diagnosis to SRS was 4.82 ± 4.89 years, and extracranial dissemination was noted in 34 (73.9%) patients. The median patient Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) score at SRS was 80, and neurological symptoms attributed to intracranial involvement were present prior to 39 (76%) SRS procedures. Single-fraction SRS was used in 49 procedures. Stereotactic radiotherapy using 6 Gy in five sessions was utilized in 2 procedures. The median margin dose was 18 (range 6–28) Gy, and the median tumor volume was 2.45 (range 0.04–45) ml. At a median radiological follow-up of 6 (range 0–156) months, local progression was seen with 14 lesions. The median survival following SRS was 15.18 months, and the 1-year overall intracranial progression-free survival was 44%. The KPS score at SRS was noted to be associated with improved overall (p = 0.02) and progression-free survival (p = 0.03). Age ≥ 65 years at SRS was associated with decreased overall survival (p = 0.04). There were no serious grade 3–5 toxicities noted.

CONCLUSIONS

SRS appears to be a safe, well-tolerated, and effective management option for patients with prostate cancer intracranial metastases.

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David T. Asuzu, Adomas Bunevicius, Rithika Kormath Anand, Mohanad Suleiman, Ahmed M. Nabeel, Wael A. Reda, Sameh R. Tawadros, Khaled Abdel Karim, Amr M. N. El-Shehaby, Reem M. Emad Eldin, Tomas Chytka, Roman Liščák, Kimball Sheehan, Darrah Sheehan, Marco Perez Caceres, David Mathieu, Cheng-chia Lee, Huai-che Yang, Piero Picozzi, Andrea Franzini, Luca Attuati, Herwin Speckter, Jeremy Olivo, Samir Patel, Christopher P. Cifarelli, Daniel T. Cifarelli, Joshua D. Hack, Ben A. Strickland, Gabriel Zada, Eric L. Chang, Kareem R. Fakhoury, Chad G. Rusthoven, Ronald E. Warnick, and Jason P. Sheehan

OBJECTIVE

Resection of meningiomas in direct contact with the anterior optic apparatus carries risk of injury to the visual pathway. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) offers a minimally invasive alternative. However, its use is limited owing to the risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy. Few SRS studies have specifically assessed the risks and benefits of treating meningiomas in direct contact with the optic nerve, chiasm, or optic tract. The authors hypothesized that SRS is safe for select patients with meningiomas in direct contact with the anterior optic apparatus.

METHODS

The authors performed an international multicenter retrospective analysis of 328 patients across 11 institutions. All patients had meningiomas in direct contract with the optic apparatus. Patients were followed for a median duration of 56 months after SRS. Neurological examinations, including visual function evaluations, were performed at follow-up visits. Clinical and treatment variables were collected at each site according to protocol. Tumor volumes were assessed with serial MR imaging. Variables predictive of visual deficit were identified using univariable and multivariable logistic regression.

RESULTS

SRS was the initial treatment modality for 64.6% of patients, and 93% of patients received SRS as a single fraction. Visual information was available for 302 patients. Of these patients, visual decline occurred in 29 patients (9.6%), of whom 12 (41.4%) had evidence of tumor progression. Visual decline in the remaining 17 patients (5.6%) was not associated with tumor progression. Pre-SRS Karnofsky Performance Status predicted visual decline in adjusted analysis (adjusted OR 0.9, 95% CI 0.9–1.0, p < 0.01). Follow-up imaging data were available for 322 patients. Of these patients, 294 patients (91.3%) had radiographic evidence of stability or tumor regression at last follow up. Symptom duration was associated with tumor progression in adjusted analysis (adjusted OR 1.01, adjusted 95% CI 1.0–1.02, adjusted p = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS

In this international multicenter study, the vast majority of patients exhibited tumor control and preservation of visual function when SRS was used to treat meningioma in direct contact with the anterior optic pathways. SRS is a relatively safe treatment modality for select patients with perioptic meningiomas in direct contact with the optic apparatus.

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I. Jonathan Pomeraniec, Zhiyuan Xu, Cheng-Chia Lee, Huai-Che Yang, Tomas Chytka, Roman Liscak, Roberto Martinez-Alvarez, Nuria Martinez-Moreno, Luca Attuati, Piero Picozzi, Douglas Kondziolka, Monica Mureb, Kenneth Bernstein, David Mathieu, Michel Maillet, Akiyoshi Ogino, Hao Long, Hideyuki Kano, L. Dade Lunsford, Brad E. Zacharia, Christine Mau, Leonard C. Tuanquin, Christopher Cifarelli, David Arsanious, Joshua Hack, Ronald E. Warnick, Ben A. Strickland, Gabriel Zada, Eric L. Chang, Herwin Speckter, Samir Patel, Dale Ding, Darrah Sheehan, Kimball Sheehan, Svetlana Kvint, Love Y. Buch, Alexander R. Haber, Jacob Shteinhart, Mary Lee Vance, and Jason P. Sheehan

OBJECTIVE

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) provides a safe and effective therapeutic modality for patients with pituitary adenomas. The mechanism of delayed endocrine deficits based on targeted radiation to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis remains unclear. Radiation to normal neuroendocrine structures likely plays a role in delayed hypopituitarism after SRS. In this multicenter study by the International Radiosurgery Research Foundation (IRRF), the authors aimed to evaluate radiation tolerance of structures surrounding pituitary adenomas and identify predictors of delayed hypopituitarism after SRS for these tumors.

METHODS

This is a retrospective review of patients with pituitary adenomas who underwent single-fraction SRS from 1997 to 2019 at 16 institutions within the IRRF. Dosimetric point measurements of 14 predefined neuroanatomical structures along the hypothalamus, pituitary stalk, and normal pituitary gland were made. Statistical analyses were performed to determine the impact of doses to critical structures on clinical, radiographic, and endocrine outcomes.

RESULTS

The study cohort comprised 521 pituitary adenomas treated with SRS. Tumor control was achieved in 93.9% of patients over a median follow-up period of 60.1 months, and 22.5% of patients developed new loss of pituitary function with a median treatment volume of 3.2 cm3. Median maximal radiosurgical doses to the hypothalamus, pituitary stalk, and normal pituitary gland were 1.4, 7.2, and 11.3 Gy, respectively. Nonfunctioning adenoma status, younger age, higher margin dose, and higher doses to the pituitary stalk and normal pituitary gland were independent predictors of new or worsening hypopituitarism. Neither the dose to the hypothalamus nor the ratio between doses to the pituitary stalk and gland were significant predictors. The threshold of the median dose to the pituitary stalk for new endocrinopathy was 10.7 Gy in a single fraction (OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.17–2.68, p = 0.006).

CONCLUSIONS

SRS for the treatment of pituitary adenomas affords a high tumor control rate with an acceptable risk of new or worsening endocrinopathy. This evaluation of point dosimetry to adjacent neuroanatomical structures revealed that doses to the pituitary stalk, with a threshold of 10.7 Gy, and doses to the normal gland significantly increased the risk of post-SRS hypopituitarism. In patients with preserved pre-SRS neuroendocrine function, limiting the dose to the pituitary stalk and gland while still delivering an optimal dose to the tumor appears prudent.

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Isaac Josh Abecassis, R. Michael Meyer, Michael R. Levitt, Jason P. Sheehan, Ching-Jen Chen, Bradley A. Gross, Ashley Lockerman, W. Christopher Fox, Waleed Brinjikji, Giuseppe Lanzino, Robert M. Starke, Stephanie H. Chen, Adriaan R. E. Potgieser, J. Marc C. van Dijk, Andrew Durnford, Diederik Bulters, Junichiro Satomi, Yoshiteru Tada, Amanda Kwasnicki, Sepideh Amin-Hanjani, Ali Alaraj, Edgar A. Samaniego, Minako Hayakawa, Colin P. Derdeyn, Ethan Winkler, Adib Abla, Pui Man Rosalind Lai, Rose Du, Ridhima Guniganti, Akash P. Kansagra, Gregory J. Zipfel, and Louis J. Kim

OBJECTIVE

There is a reported elevated risk of cerebral aneurysms in patients with intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs). However, the natural history, rate of spontaneous regression, and ideal treatment regimen are not well characterized. In this study, the authors aimed to describe the characteristics of patients with dAVFs and intracranial aneurysms and propose a classification system.

METHODS

The Consortium for Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Outcomes Research (CONDOR) database from 12 centers was retrospectively reviewed. Analysis was performed to compare dAVF patients with (dAVF+ cohort) and without (dAVF-only cohort) concomitant aneurysm. Aneurysms were categorized based on location as a dAVF flow-related aneurysm (FRA) or a dAVF non–flow-related aneurysm (NFRA), with further classification as extra- or intradural. Patients with traumatic pseudoaneurysms or aneurysms with associated arteriovenous malformations were excluded from the analysis. Patient demographics, dAVF anatomical information, aneurysm information, and follow-up data were collected.

RESULTS

Of the 1077 patients, 1043 were eligible for inclusion, comprising 978 (93.8%) and 65 (6.2%) in the dAVF-only and dAVF+ cohorts, respectively. There were 96 aneurysms in the dAVF+ cohort; 10 patients (1%) harbored 12 FRAs, and 55 patients (5.3%) harbored 84 NFRAs. Dural AVF+ patients had higher rates of smoking (59.3% vs 35.2%, p < 0.001) and illicit drug use (5.8% vs 1.5%, p = 0.02). Sixteen dAVF+ patients (24.6%) presented with aneurysm rupture, which represented 16.7% of the total aneurysms. One patient (1.5%) had aneurysm rupture during follow-up. Patients with dAVF+ were more likely to have a dAVF located in nonconventional locations, less likely to have arterial supply to the dAVF from external carotid artery branches, and more likely to have supply from pial branches. Rates of cortical venous drainage and Borden type distributions were comparable between cohorts. A minority (12.5%) of aneurysms were FRAs. The majority of the aneurysms underwent treatment via either endovascular (36.5%) or microsurgical (15.6%) technique. A small proportion of aneurysms managed conservatively either with or without dAVF treatment spontaneously regressed (6.2%).

CONCLUSIONS

Patients with dAVF have a similar risk of harboring a concomitant intracranial aneurysm unrelated to the dAVF (5.3%) compared with the general population (approximately 2%–5%) and a rare risk (0.9%) of harboring an FRA. Only 50% of FRAs are intradural. Dural AVF+ patients have differences in dAVF angioarchitecture. A subset of dAVF+ patients harbor FRAs that may regress after dAVF treatment.

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Edgar A. Samaniego, Jorge A. Roa, Minako Hayakawa, Ching-Jen Chen, Jason P. Sheehan, Louis J. Kim, Isaac Josh Abecassis, Michael R. Levitt, Ridhima Guniganti, Akash P. Kansagra, Giuseppe Lanzino, Enrico Giordan, Waleed Brinjikji, Diederik Bulters, Andrew Durnford, W. Christopher Fox, Adam J. Polifka, Bradley A. Gross, Sepideh Amin-Hanjani, Ali Alaraj, Amanda Kwasnicki, Robert M. Starke, Samir Sur, J. Marc C. van Dijk, Adriaan R. E. Potgieser, Junichiro Satomi, Yoshiteru Tada, Adib Abla, Ethan Winkler, Rose Du, Pui Man Rosalind Lai, Gregory J. Zipfel, and Colin P. Derdeyn

OBJECTIVE

Current evidence suggests that intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) without cortical venous drainage (CVD) have a benign clinical course. However, no large study has evaluated the safety and efficacy of current treatments and their impact over the natural history of dAVFs without CVD.

METHODS

The authors conducted an analysis of the retrospectively collected multicenter Consortium for Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Outcomes Research (CONDOR) database. Patient demographics and presenting symptoms, angiographic features of the dAVFs, and treatment outcomes of patients with Borden type I dAVFs were reviewed. Clinical and radiological follow-up information was assessed to determine rates of new intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) or nonhemorrhagic neurological deficit (NHND), worsening of venous hyperdynamic symptoms (VHSs), angiographic recurrence, and progression or spontaneous regression of dAVFs over time.

RESULTS

A total of 342 patients/Borden type I dAVFs were identified. The mean patient age was 58.1 ± 15.6 years, and 62% were women. The mean follow-up time was 37.7 ± 54.3 months. Of 230 (67.3%) treated dAVFs, 178 (77%) underwent mainly endovascular embolization, 11 (4.7%) radiosurgery alone, and 4 (1.7%) open surgery as the primary modality. After the first embolization, most dAVFs (47.2%) achieved only partial reduction in early venous filling. Multiple complementary interventions increased complete obliteration rates from 37.9% after first embolization to 46.7% after two or more embolizations, and 55.2% after combined radiosurgery and open surgery. Immediate postprocedural complications occurred in 35 dAVFs (15.2%) and 6 (2.6%) with permanent sequelae. Of 127 completely obliterated dAVFs by any therapeutic modality, 2 (1.6%) showed angiographic recurrence/recanalization at a mean of 34.2 months after treatment. Progression to Borden-Shucart type II or III was documented in 2.2% of patients and subsequent development of a new dAVF in 1.6%. Partial spontaneous regression was found in 22 (21.4%) of 103 nontreated dAVFs. Multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that older age, NHND, or severe venous-hyperdynamic symptoms at presentation and infratentorial location were associated with worse prognosis. Kaplan-Meier curves showed no significant difference for stable/improved symptoms survival probability in treated versus nontreated dAVFs. However, estimated survival times showed better trends for treated dAVFs compared with nontreated dAVFs (288.1 months vs 151.1 months, log-rank p = 0.28). This difference was statistically significant for treated dAVFs with 100% occlusion (394 months, log-rank p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Current therapeutic modalities for management of dAVFs without CVD may provide better symptom control when complete angiographic occlusion is achieved.

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Ching-Jen Chen, Thomas J. Buell, Dale Ding, Ridhima Guniganti, Akash P. Kansagra, Giuseppe Lanzino, Enrico Giordan, Louis J. Kim, Michael R. Levitt, Isaac Josh Abecassis, Diederik Bulters, Andrew Durnford, W. Christopher Fox, Adam J. Polifka, Bradley A. Gross, Minako Hayakawa, Colin P. Derdeyn, Edgar A. Samaniego, Sepideh Amin-Hanjani, Ali Alaraj, Amanda Kwasnicki, J. Marc C. van Dijk, Adriaan R. E. Potgieser, Robert M. Starke, Samir Sur, Junichiro Satomi, Yoshiteru Tada, Adib A. Abla, Ethan A. Winkler, Rose Du, Pui Man Rosalind Lai, Gregory J. Zipfel, and Jason P. Sheehan

OBJECTIVE

The risk-to-benefit profile of treating an unruptured high-grade dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) is not clearly defined. The aim of this multicenter retrospective cohort study was to compare the outcomes of different interventions with observation for unruptured high-grade dAVFs.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed dAVF patients from 12 institutions participating in the Consortium for Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Outcomes Research (CONDOR). Patients with unruptured high-grade (Borden type II or III) dAVFs were included and categorized into four groups (observation, embolization, surgery, and stereotactic radiosurgery [SRS]) based on the initial management. The primary outcome was defined as the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score at final follow-up. Secondary outcomes were good outcome (mRS scores 0–2) at final follow-up, symptomatic improvement, all-cause mortality, and dAVF obliteration. The outcomes of each intervention group were compared against those of the observation group as a reference, with adjustment for differences in baseline characteristics.

RESULTS

The study included 415 dAVF patients, accounting for 29, 324, 43, and 19 in the observation, embolization, surgery, and SRS groups, respectively. The mean radiological and clinical follow-up durations were 21 and 25 months, respectively. Functional outcomes were similar for embolization, surgery, and SRS compared with observation. With observation as a reference, obliteration rates were higher after embolization (adjusted OR [aOR] 7.147, p = 0.010) and surgery (aOR 33.803, p < 0.001) and all-cause mortality was lower after embolization (imputed, aOR 0.171, p = 0.040). Hemorrhage rates per 1000 patient-years were 101 for observation versus 9, 22, and 0 for embolization (p = 0.022), surgery (p = 0.245), and SRS (p = 0.077), respectively. Nonhemorrhagic neurological deficit rates were similar between each intervention group versus observation.

CONCLUSIONS

Embolization and surgery for unruptured high-grade dAVFs afforded a greater likelihood of obliteration than did observation. Embolization also reduced the risk of death and dAVF-associated hemorrhage compared with conservative management over a modest follow-up period. These findings support embolization as the first-line treatment of choice for appropriately selected unruptured Borden type II and III dAVFs.

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Isaac Josh Abecassis, R. Michael Meyer, Michael R. Levitt, Jason P. Sheehan, Ching-Jen Chen, Bradley A. Gross, Jessica Smith, W. Christopher Fox, Enrico Giordan, Giuseppe Lanzino, Robert M. Starke, Samir Sur, Adriaan R. E. Potgieser, J. Marc C. van Dijk, Andrew Durnford, Diederik Bulters, Junichiro Satomi, Yoshiteru Tada, Amanda Kwasnicki, Sepideh Amin-Hanjani, Ali Alaraj, Edgar A. Samaniego, Minako Hayakawa, Colin P. Derdeyn, Ethan Winkler, Adib Abla, Pui Man Rosalind Lai, Rose Du, Ridhima Guniganti, Akash P. Kansagra, Gregory J. Zipfel, and Louis J. Kim

OBJECTIVE

Cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) are often treated with endovascular therapy, but occasionally a multimodality approach including surgery and/or radiosurgery is utilized. Recurrence after an initial angiographic cure has been reported, with estimated rates ranging from 2% to 14.3%, but few risk factors have been identified. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors associated with recurrence of dAVF after putative cure.

METHODS

The Consortium for Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Outcomes Research (CONDOR) data were retrospectively reviewed. All patients with angiographic cure after treatment and subsequent angiographic follow-up were included. The primary outcome was recurrence, with risk factor analysis. Secondary outcomes included clinical outcomes, morbidity, and mortality associated with recurrence. Risk factor analysis was performed comparing the group of patients who experienced recurrence with those with durable cure (regardless of multiple recurrences). Time-to-event analysis was performed using all collective recurrence events (multiple per patients in some cases).

RESULTS

Of the 1077 patients included in the primary CONDOR data set, 457 met inclusion criteria. A total of 32 patients (7%) experienced 34 events of recurrence at a mean of 368.7 days (median 192 days). The recurrence rate was 4.5% overall. Kaplan-Meier analysis predicted long-term recurrence rates approaching 11% at 3 years. Grade III dAVFs treated with endovascular therapy were statistically significantly more likely to experience recurrence than those treated surgically (13.3% vs 0%, p = 0.0001). Tentorial location, cortical venous drainage, and deep cerebral venous drainage were all risk factors for recurrence. Endovascular intervention and radiosurgery were associated with recurrence. Six recurrences were symptomatic, including 2 with hemorrhage, 3 with nonhemorrhagic neurological deficit, and 1 with progressive flow-related symptoms (decreased vision).

CONCLUSIONS

Recurrence of dAVFs after putative cure can occur after endovascular treatment. Risk factors include tentorial location, cortical venous drainage, and deep cerebral drainage. Multimodality therapy can be used to achieve cure after recurrence. A delayed long-term angiographic evaluation (at least 1 year from cure) may be warranted, especially in cases with risk factors for recurrence.

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David Mathieu, Rupesh Kotecha, Arjun Sahgal, Antonio De Salles, Laura Fariselli, Bruce E. Pollock, Marc Levivier, Lijun Ma, Ian Paddick, Jean Regis, Shoji Yomo, John H. Suh, Muni Rubens, and Jason P. Sheehan

OBJECTIVE

A systematic review was performed to provide objective evidence on the use of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the management of secretory pituitary adenomas and develop consensus recommendations.

METHODS

The authors performed a systematic review of the English-language literature up until June 2018 using the PRISMA guidelines. The PubMed (Medline), Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched. A total of 45 articles reporting single-institution outcomes of SRS for acromegaly, Cushing’s disease, and prolactinomas were selected and included in the analysis.

RESULTS

For acromegaly, random effects meta-analysis estimates for crude tumor control rate, crude endocrine remission rate, and any new hypopituitarism rates were 97.0% (95% CI 96.0%–98.0%), 44.0% (95% CI 35.0%–53.0%), and 17.0% (95% CI 13.0%–23.0%), respectively. For Cushing’s disease, random effects estimates for crude tumor control rate, crude endocrine remission rate, and any new hypopituitarism rate were 92.0% (95% CI 87.0%–95.0%), 48.0% (95% CI 35.0%–61.0%), and 21.0% (95% CI 13.0%–31.0%), respectively. For prolactinomas, random effects estimates for crude tumor control rate, crude endocrine remission rate, and any new hypopituitarism rate were 93.0% (95% CI 90.0%–95.0%), 28.0% (95% CI 19.0%–39.0%), and 12.0% (95% CI 6.0%–24.0%), respectively. Meta-regression analysis did not show a statistically significant association between mean margin dose with crude endocrine remission rate or mean margin dose with development of any new hypopituitarism rate for any of the secretory subtypes.

CONCLUSIONS

SRS offers effective tumor control of hormone-producing pituitary adenomas in the majority of patients but a lower rate of endocrine improvement or remission.

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Zachary A. Seymour, Jason W. Chan, Michael W. McDermott, Inga Grills, Hong Ye, Hideyuki Kano, Craig A. Lehocky, Rachel C. Jacobs, L. Dade Lunsford, Tomas Chytka, Roman Liščák, Cheng-Chia Lee, Huai-che Yang, Dale Ding, Jason P. Sheehan, Caleb E. Feliciano, Rafael Rodriguez-Mercado, Veronica L. Chiang, Judith A. Hess, Samuel Sommaruga, Brendan McShane, John Y. K. Lee, Lucas T. Vasas, Anthony M. Kaufmann, and Penny K. Sneed

OBJECTIVE

The optimal treatment paradigm for large arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) is controversial. One approach is volume-staged stereotactic radiosurgery (VS-SRS). The authors previously reported efficacy of VS-SRS for large AVMs in a multiinstitutional cohort; here they focus on risk of symptomatic adverse radiation effects (AREs).

METHODS

This is a multicentered retrospective review of patients treated with a planned prospective volume staging approach to stereotactically treat the entire nidus of an AVM, with volume stages separated by intervals of 3–6 months. A total of 9 radiosurgical centers treated 257 patients with VS-SRS between 1991 and 2016. The authors evaluated permanent, transient, and total ARE events that were symptomatic.

RESULTS

Patients received 2–4 total volume stages. The median age was 33 years at the time of the first SRS volume stage, and the median follow-up was 5.7 years after VS-SRS. The median total AVM nidus volume was 23.25 cm3 (range 7.7–94.4 cm3), with a median margin dose per stage of 17 Gy (range 12–20 Gy). A total of 64 patients (25%) experienced an ARE, of which 19 were permanent. Rather than volume, maximal linear dimension in the Z (craniocaudal) dimension was associated with toxicity; a threshold length of 3.28 cm was associated with an ARE, with a 72.5% sensitivity and a 58.3% specificity. In addition, parietal lobe involvement for superficial lesions and temporal lobe involvement for deep lesions were associated with an ARE.

CONCLUSIONS

Size remains the dominant predictor of toxicity following SRS, but overall rates of AREs were lower than anticipated based on baseline features, suggesting that dose and size were relatively dissociated through volume staging. Further techniques need to be assessed to optimize outcomes.

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Nasser Mohammed, Yi-Chieh Hung, Zhiyuan Xu, Tomas Chytka, Roman Liscak, Manjul Tripathi, David Arsanious, Christopher P. Cifarelli, Marco Perez Caceres, David Mathieu, Herwin Speckter, Gautam U. Mehta, Gregory P. Lekovic, and Jason P. Sheehan

OBJECTIVE

The management of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2)–associated meningiomas is challenging. The role of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) in the treatment of these tumors remains to be fully defined. In this study, the authors aimed to examine the role of GKRS in the treatment of NF2-associated meningiomas and to evaluate the outcomes and complications after treatment.

METHODS

Seven international medical centers contributed data for this retrospective cohort. Tumor progression was defined as a ≥ 20% increase from the baseline value. The clinical features, treatment details, outcomes, and complications were studied. The median follow-up was 8.5 years (range 0.6–25.5 years) from the time of initial GKRS. Shared frailty Cox regression was used for analysis.

RESULTS

A total of 204 meningiomas in 39 patients treated with GKRS were analyzed. Cox regression analysis showed that increasing the maximum dose (p = 0.02; HR 12.2, 95% CI 1.287–116.7) and a lower number of meningiomas at presentation (p = 0.03; HR 0.9, 95% CI 0.821–0.990) were predictive of better tumor control in both univariable and multivariable settings. Age at onset, sex, margin dose, location, and presence of neurological deficit were not predictive of tumor progression. The cumulative 10-year progression-free survival was 94.8%. Radiation-induced adverse effects were noted in 4 patients (10%); these were transient and managed medically. No post-GKRS malignant transformation was noted in 287 person-years of follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS

GKRS achieved effective tumor control with a low and generally acceptable rate of complications in NF2-associated meningiomas. There did not appear to be an appreciable risk of post–GKRS-induced malignancy in patients with NF2-treated meningiomas.