Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 159 items for

  • Refine by Access: all x
  • By Author: Sciubba, Daniel M. x
Clear All
Restricted access

Are insufficient corrections a major factor in distal junctional kyphosis? A simulated analysis of cervical deformity correction using in-construct measurements

Fares Ani, Ethan Sissman, Dainn Woo, Alex Soroceanu, Gregory Mundis Jr., Robert K. Eastlack, Justin S. Smith, D. Kojo Hamilton, Han Jo Kim, Alan H. Daniels, Eric O. Klineberg, Brian Neuman, Daniel M. Sciubba, Munish C. Gupta, Khaled M. Kebaish, Peter G. Passias, Robert A. Hart, Shay Bess, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Frank J. Schwab, Virginie Lafage, Christopher P. Ames, and Themistocles S. Protopsaltis

OBJECTIVE

The present study utilized recently developed in-construct measurements in simulations of cervical deformity surgery in order to assess undercorrection and predict distal junctional kyphosis (DJK).

METHODS

A retrospective review of a database of operative cervical deformity patients was analyzed for severe DJK and mild DJK. C2–lower instrumented vertebra (LIV) sagittal angle (SA) was measured postoperatively, and the correction was simulated in the preoperative radiograph in order to match the C2-LIV by using the planning software. Linear regression analysis that used C2 pelvic angle (CPA) and pelvic tilt (PT) determined the simulated PT that matched the virtual CPA. Linear regression analysis was used to determine the C2–T1 SA, C2–T4 SA, and C2–T10 SA that corresponded to DJK of 20° and cervical sagittal vertical axis (cSVA) of 40 mm.

RESULTS

Sixty-nine cervical deformity patients were included. Severe and mild DJK occurred in 11 (16%) and 22 (32%) patients, respectively; 3 (4%) required DJK revision. Simulated corrections demonstrated that severe and mild DJK patients had worse alignment compared to non-DJK patients in terms of cSVA (42.5 mm vs 33.0 mm vs 23.4 mm, p < 0.001) and C2-LIV SVA (68.9 mm vs 57.3 mm vs 36.8 mm, p < 0.001). Linear regression revealed the relationships between in-construct measures (C2–T1 SA, C2–T4 SA, and C2–T10 SA), cSVA, and change in DJK (all R > 0.57, p < 0.001). A cSVA of 40 mm corresponded to C2–T4 SA of 10.4° and C2–T10 SA of 28.0°. A DJK angle change of 10° corresponded to C2–T4 SA of 5.8° and C2–T10 SA of 20.1°.

CONCLUSIONS

Simulated cervical deformity corrections demonstrated that severe DJK patients have insufficient corrections compared to patients without DJK. In-construct measures assess sagittal alignment within the fusion separate from DJK and subjacent compensation. They can be useful as intraoperative tools to gauge the adequacy of cervical deformity correction.

Restricted access

Treatment of intramedullary spinal cord tumors: a modified Delphi technique of the North American Spine Society Section of Spine Oncology

Presented at the 2023 AANS/CNS Joint Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves

Andrew M. Hersh, Zach Pennington, Daniel Lubelski, Aladine A. Elsamadicy, Nicolas Dea, Atman Desai, Ziya L. Gokaslan, C. Rory Goodwin, Wesley Hsu, George I. Jallo, Ajit Krishnaney, Ilya Laufer, Sheng-Fu Larry Lo, Mohamed Macki, Ankit I. Mehta, Ali Ozturk, John H. Shin, Hesham Soliman, and Daniel M. Sciubba

OBJECTIVE

Intramedullary spinal cord tumors (IMSCTs) are rare tumors with heterogeneous presentations and natural histories that complicate their management. Standardized guidelines are lacking on when to surgically intervene and the appropriate aggressiveness of resection, especially given the risk of new neurological deficits following resection of infiltrative tumors. Here, the authors present the results of a modified Delphi method using input from surgeons experienced with IMSCT removal to construct a framework for the operative management of IMSCTs based on the clinical, radiographic, and tumor-specific characteristics.

METHODS

A modified Delphi technique was conducted using a group of 14 neurosurgeons experienced in IMSCT resection. Three rounds of written correspondence, surveys, and videoconferencing were carried out. Participants were queried about clinical and radiographic criteria used to determine operative candidacy and guide decision-making. Members then completed a final survey indicating their choice of observation or surgery, choice of resection strategy, and decision to perform duraplasty, in response to a set of patient- and tumor-specific characteristics. Consensus was defined as ≥ 80% agreement, while responses with 70%–79% agreement were defined as agreement.

RESULTS

Thirty-six total characteristics were assessed. There was consensus favoring surgical intervention for patients with new-onset myelopathy (86% agreement), chronic myelopathy (86%), or progression from mild to disabling numbness (86%), but disagreement for patients with mild numbness or chronic paraplegia. Age was not a determinant of operative candidacy except among frail patients, who were deemed more suitable for observation (93%). Well-circumscribed (93%) or posteriorly located tumors reaching the surface (86%) were consensus surgical lesions, and participants agreed that the presence of syringomyelia (71%) and peritumoral T2 signal change (79%) were favorable indications for surgery. There was consensus that complete loss of transcranial motor evoked potentials with a 50% decrease in the D-wave amplitude should halt further resection (93%). Preoperative symptoms seldom influenced choice of resection strategy, while a distinct cleavage plane (100%) or visible tumor-cord margins (100%) strongly favored gross-total resection.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors present a modified Delphi technique highlighting areas of consensus and agreement regarding surgical management of IMSCTs. Although not intended as a substitute for individual clinical decision-making, the results can help guide care of these patients. Additionally, areas of controversy meriting further investigation are highlighted.

Restricted access

Editorial. Evidence for biomarkers in oncological spine surgery

Gabrielle Santangelo and Daniel M. Sciubba

Free access

Risk factors for sacral fracture following en bloc chordoma resection

Presented at the 2023 AANS/CNS Joint Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves

Anthony L. Mikula, Zach Pennington, Nikita Lakomkin, Marc Prablek, Behrang Amini, S. Mohammed Karim, Shalin S. Patel, Daniel Lubelski, Daniel M. Sciubba, Christopher Alvarez-Breckenridge, Robert Y. North, Claudio E. Tatsui, Mohamad Bydon, Jeremy L. Fogelson, Benjamin D. Elder, William E. Krauss, Justin E. Bird, Peter S. Rose, Michelle J. Clarke, and Laurence D. Rhines

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to analyze risk factors for sacral fracture following noninstrumented partial sacral amputation for en bloc chordoma resection.

METHODS

A multicenter retrospective chart review identified patients who underwent noninstrumented partial sacral amputation for en bloc chordoma resection with pre- and postoperative imaging. Hounsfield units (HU) were measured in the S1 level. Sacral amputation level nomenclature was based on the highest sacral level with bone removed (e.g., S1 foramen amputation at the S1–2 vestigial disc is an S2 sacral amputation). Variables collected included basic demographics, patient comorbidities, surgical approach, preoperative radiographic details, neoadjuvant and adjuvant radiation therapy, and postoperative sacral fracture data.

RESULTS

A total of 101 patients (60 men, 41 women) were included; they had an average age of 69 years, BMI of 29 kg/m2, and follow-up of 60 months. The sacral amputation level was S1 (2%), S2 (37%), S3 (44%), S4 (9%), and S5 (9%). Patients had a posterior-only approach (77%) or a combined anterior–posterior approach (23%), with 10 patients (10%) having partial sacroiliac (SI) joint resection. Twenty-seven patients (27%) suffered a postoperative sacral fracture, all occurring between 1 and 7 months after the index surgery. Multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated S1 or S2 sacral amputation level (p = 0.001), combined anterior–posterior approach (p = 0.0064), and low superior S1 HU (p = 0.027) to be independent predictors of sacral fracture. The fracture rate for patients with superior S1 HU < 225, 225–300, and > 300 was 38%, 15%, and 9%, respectively. An optimal superior S1 HU cutoff of 300 was found to maximize sensitivity (89%) and specificity (42%) in predicting postamputation sacral fracture. In addition, the fracture rate for patients who underwent partial SI joint resection was 100%.

CONCLUSIONS

Patients with S1 or S2 partial sacral amputations, a combined anterior–posterior surgical approach, low superior S1 HU, and partial SI joint resection are at higher risk for postoperative sacral fracture following en bloc chordoma resection and should be considered for spinopelvic instrumentation at the index procedure.

Restricted access

Creation and preclinical evaluation of a novel mussel-inspired, biomimetic, bioactive bone graft scaffold: direct comparison with Infuse bone graft using a rat model of spinal fusion

Ethan Cottrill, Zach Pennington, Matthew T. Wolf, Naomi Dirckx, Jeff Ehresman, Alexander Perdomo-Pantoja, Christian Rajkovic, Jessica Lin, David R. Maestas Jr., Ashlie Mageau, Dennis Lambrechts, Veronica Stewart, Daniel M. Sciubba, Nicholas Theodore, Jennifer H. Elisseeff, and Timothy Witham

OBJECTIVE

Infuse bone graft is a widely used osteoinductive adjuvant; however, the simple collagen sponge scaffold used in the implant has minimal inherent osteoinductive properties and poorly controls the delivery of the adsorbed recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein–2 (rhBMP-2). In this study, the authors sought to create a novel bone graft substitute material that overcomes the limitations of Infuse and compare the ability of this material with that of Infuse to facilitate union following spine surgery in a clinically translatable rat model of spinal fusion.

METHODS

The authors created a polydopamine (PDA)–infused, porous, homogeneously dispersed solid mixture of extracellular matrix and calcium phosphates (BioMim-PDA) and then compared the efficacy of this material directly with Infuse in the setting of different concentrations of rhBMP-2 using a rat model of spinal fusion. Sixty male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to each of six equal groups: 1) collagen + 0.2 µg rhBMP-2/side, 2) BioMim-PDA + 0.2 µg rhBMP-2/side, 3) collagen + 2.0 µg rhBMP-2/side, 4) BioMim-PDA + 2.0 μg rhBMP-2/side, 5) collagen + 20 µg rhBMP-2/side, and 6) BioMim-PDA + 20 µg rhBMP-2/side. All animals underwent posterolateral intertransverse process fusion at L4–5 using the assigned bone graft. Animals were euthanized 8 weeks postoperatively, and their lumbar spines were analyzed via microcomputed tomography (µCT) and histology. Spinal fusion was defined as continuous bridging bone bilaterally across the fusion site evaluated via µCT.

RESULTS

The fusion rate was 100% in all groups except group 1 (70%) and group 4 (90%). Use of BioMim-PDA with 0.2 µg rhBMP-2 led to significantly greater results for bone volume (BV), percentage BV, and trabecular number, as well as significantly smaller trabecular separation, compared with the use of the collagen sponge with 2.0 µg rhBMP-2. The same results were observed when the use of BioMim-PDA with 2.0 µg rhBMP-2 was compared with the use of the collagen sponge with 20 µg rhBMP-2.

CONCLUSIONS

Implantation of rhBMP-2–adsorbed BioMim-PDA scaffolds resulted in BV and bone quality superior to that afforded by treatment with rhBMP-2 concentrations 10-fold higher implanted on a conventional collagen sponge. Using BioMim-PDA (vs a collagen sponge) for rhBMP-2 delivery could significantly lower the amount of rhBMP-2 required for successful bone grafting clinically, improving device safety and decreasing costs.

Open access

Perception of frailty in spinal metastatic disease: international survey of the AO Spine community

Mark A. MacLean, Miltiadis Georgiopoulos, Raphaële Charest-Morin, C. Rory Goodwin, Ilya Laufer, Nicolas Dea, John H. Shin, Ziya L. Gokaslan, Laurence D. Rhines, John E. O’Toole, Daniel M. Sciubba, Michael G. Fehlings, Byron F. Stephens, Chetan Bettegowda, Sten Myrehaug, Alexander C. Disch, Cordula Netzer, Naresh Kumar, Arjun Sahgal, Niccole M. Germscheid, Michael H. Weber, and on behalf of the AO Spine Knowledge Forum Tumor

OBJECTIVE

Frailty has not been clearly defined in the context of spinal metastatic disease (SMD). Given this, the objective of this study was to better understand how members of the international AO Spine community conceptualize, define, and assess frailty in SMD.

METHODS

The AO Spine Knowledge Forum Tumor conducted an international cross-sectional survey of the AO Spine community. The survey was developed using a modified Delphi technique and was designed to capture preoperative surrogate markers of frailty and relevant postoperative clinical outcomes in the context of SMD. Responses were ranked using weighted averages. Consensus was defined as ≥ 70% agreement among respondents.

RESULTS

Results were analyzed for 359 respondents, with an 87% completion rate. Study participants represented 71 countries. In the clinical setting, most respondents informally assess frailty and cognition in patients with SMD by forming a general perception based on clinical condition and patient history. Consensus was attained among respondents regarding the association between 14 preoperative clinical variables and frailty. Severe comorbidities, extensive systemic disease burden, and poor performance status were most associated with frailty. Severe comorbidities associated with frailty included high-risk cardiopulmonary disease, renal failure, liver failure, and malnutrition. The most clinically relevant outcomes were major complications, neurological recovery, and change in performance status.

CONCLUSIONS

The respondents recognized that frailty is important, but they most commonly evaluate it based on general clinical impressions rather than using existing frailty tools. The authors identified numerous preoperative surrogate markers of frailty and postoperative clinical outcomes that spine surgeons perceived as most relevant in this population.

Free access

Letter to the Editor. Limitations of the Hospital Frailty Risk Score in metastatic spinal column tumor surgery

Kavelin Rumalla, Meic H. Schmidt, and Christian A. Bowers

Free access

Introduction. Big data and its impact on the future of neurosurgery

Michael Y. Wang, Jang W. Yoon, Gelareh Zadeh, Paul Park, Erica F. Bisson, and Daniel M. Sciubba

Free access

Perioperative outcomes and survival after surgery for intramedullary spinal cord tumors: a single-institution series of 302 patients

Andrew M. Hersh, Jaimin Patel, Zach Pennington, Jose L. Porras, Earl Goldsborough, Albert Antar, Aladine A. Elsamadicy, Daniel Lubelski, Jean-Paul Wolinsky, George Jallo, Ziya L. Gokaslan, Sheng-Fu Larry Lo, and Daniel M. Sciubba

OBJECTIVE

Intramedullary spinal cord tumors (IMSCTs) are rare neoplasms whose treatment is often technically challenging. Given the low volume seen at most centers, perioperative outcomes have been reported infrequently. Here, the authors present the largest single-institution series of IMSCTs, focusing on the clinical presentation, histological makeup, perioperative outcomes, and long-term survival of surgically treated patients.

METHODS

A cohort of patients operated on for primary IMSCTs at a comprehensive cancer center between June 2002 and May 2020 was retrospectively identified. Data on patient demographics, tumor histology, neuraxial location, baseline neurological status, functional deficits, and operative characteristics were collected. Perioperative outcomes of interest included length of stay, postoperative complications, readmission, reoperation, and discharge disposition. Data were compared across tumor histologies using the Kruskal-Wallis H test, chi-square test, and Fisher exact test. Pairwise comparisons were conducted using Tukey’s honest significant difference test, chi-square test, and Fisher exact test. Long-term survival was assessed across tumor categories and histological subtype using the log-rank test.

RESULTS

Three hundred two patients were included in the study (mean age 34.9 ± 19 years, 77% white, 57% male). The most common tumors were ependymomas (47%), astrocytomas (31%), and hemangioblastomas (11%). Ependymomas and hemangioblastomas disproportionately localized to the cervical cord (54% and 59%, respectively), whereas astrocytomas were distributed almost equally between the cervical cord (36%) and thoracic cord (38%). Clinical presentation, extent of functional dependence, and postoperative 30-day outcomes were largely independent of underlying tumor pathology, although tumors of the thoracic cord had worse American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) grades than cervical tumors. Rates of gross-total resection were lower for astrocytomas than for ependymomas (54% vs 84%, p < 0.01) and hemangioblastomas (54% vs 100%, p < 0.01). Additionally, 30-day readmission rates were significantly higher for astrocytomas than ependymomas (14% vs 6%, p = 0.02). Overall survival was significantly affected by the underlying pathology, with astrocytomas having poorer associated prognoses (40% at 15 years) than ependymomas (81%) and hemangioblastomas (66%; p < 0.01) and patients with high-grade ependymomas and astrocytomas having poorer long-term survival than those with low-grade lesions (p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

The neuraxial location of IMSCTs, extent of resection, and postoperative survival differed significantly across tumor pathologies. However, perioperative outcomes did not vary significantly across tumor cohorts, suggesting that operative details, rather than pathology, may have a stronger influence on the short-term clinical course, whereas pathology appears to have a stronger impact on long-term survival.

Free access

Hospital Frailty Risk Score and healthcare resource utilization after surgery for metastatic spinal column tumors

Aladine A. Elsamadicy, Andrew B. Koo, Benjamin C. Reeves, Zach Pennington, James Yu, C. Rory Goodwin, Luis Kolb, Maxwell Laurans, Sheng-Fu Larry Lo, John H. Shin, and Daniel M. Sciubba

OBJECTIVE

The Hospital Frailty Risk Score (HFRS) was developed utilizing ICD-10 diagnostic codes to identify frailty and predict adverse outcomes in large national databases. While other studies have examined frailty in spine oncology, the HFRS has not been assessed in this patient population. The aim of this study was to examine the association of HFRS-defined frailty with complication rates, length of stay (LOS), total cost of hospital admission, and discharge disposition in patients undergoing spine surgery for metastatic spinal column tumors.

METHODS

A retrospective cohort study was performed using the years 2016 to 2019 of the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. All adult patients (≥ 18 years old) undergoing surgical intervention for metastatic spinal column tumors were identified using the ICD-10-CM diagnostic codes and Procedural Coding System. Patients were categorized into the following three cohorts based on their HFRS: low frailty (HFRS < 5), intermediate frailty (HFRS 5–15), and high frailty (HFRS > 15). Patient demographics, comorbidities, treatment modality, perioperative complications, LOS, discharge disposition, and total cost of hospital admission were assessed. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors of prolonged LOS, nonroutine discharge, and increased cost.

RESULTS

Of the 11,480 patients identified, 7085 (61.7%) were found to have low frailty, 4160 (36.2%) had intermediate frailty, and 235 (2.0%) had high frailty according to HFRS criteria. On average, age increased along with progressively worsening frailty scores (p ≤ 0.001). The proportion of patients in each cohort who experienced ≥ 1 postoperative complication significantly increased along with increasing frailty (low frailty: 29.2%; intermediate frailty: 53.8%; high frailty: 76.6%; p < 0.001). In addition, the mean LOS (low frailty: 7.9 ± 5.0 days; intermediate frailty: 14.4 ± 13.4 days; high frailty: 24.1 ± 18.6 days; p < 0.001), rate of nonroutine discharge (low frailty: 40.4%; intermediate frailty: 60.6%; high frailty: 70.2%; p < 0.001), and mean total cost of hospital admission (low frailty: $48,603 ± $29,979; intermediate frailty: $65,271 ± $43,110; high frailty: $96,116 ± $60,815; p < 0.001) each increased along with progressing frailty. On multivariate regression analysis, intermediate and high frailty were each found to be significant predictors of both prolonged LOS (intermediate: OR 3.75 [95% CI 2.96–4.75], p < 0.001; high: OR 7.33 [95% CI 3.47–15.51]; p < 0.001) and nonroutine discharge (intermediate: OR 2.05 [95% CI 1.68–2.51], p < 0.001; high: OR 5.06 [95% CI 1.93–13.30], p = 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

This study is the first to use the HFRS to assess the impact of frailty on perioperative outcomes in patients with metastatic bony spinal tumors. Among patients with metastatic bony spinal tumors, frailty assessed using the HFRS was associated with longer hospitalizations, more nonroutine discharges, and higher total hospital costs.