Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 153 items for

  • Refine by Access: all x
  • By Author: Sciubba, Daniel M. x
Clear All
Restricted access

Kavelin Rumalla, Meic H. Schmidt, and Christian A. Bowers

Free access

Michael Y. Wang, Jang W. Yoon, Gelareh Zadeh, Paul Park, Erica F. Bisson, and Daniel M. Sciubba

Restricted access

Andrew M. Hersh, Jaimin Patel, Zach Pennington, Jose L. Porras, Earl Goldsborough, Albert Antar, Aladine A. Elsamadicy, Daniel Lubelski, Jean-Paul Wolinsky, George Jallo, Ziya L. Gokaslan, Sheng-Fu Larry Lo, and Daniel M. Sciubba

OBJECTIVE

Intramedullary spinal cord tumors (IMSCTs) are rare neoplasms whose treatment is often technically challenging. Given the low volume seen at most centers, perioperative outcomes have been reported infrequently. Here, the authors present the largest single-institution series of IMSCTs, focusing on the clinical presentation, histological makeup, perioperative outcomes, and long-term survival of surgically treated patients.

METHODS

A cohort of patients operated on for primary IMSCTs at a comprehensive cancer center between June 2002 and May 2020 was retrospectively identified. Data on patient demographics, tumor histology, neuraxial location, baseline neurological status, functional deficits, and operative characteristics were collected. Perioperative outcomes of interest included length of stay, postoperative complications, readmission, reoperation, and discharge disposition. Data were compared across tumor histologies using the Kruskal-Wallis H test, chi-square test, and Fisher exact test. Pairwise comparisons were conducted using Tukey’s honest significant difference test, chi-square test, and Fisher exact test. Long-term survival was assessed across tumor categories and histological subtype using the log-rank test.

RESULTS

Three hundred two patients were included in the study (mean age 34.9 ± 19 years, 77% white, 57% male). The most common tumors were ependymomas (47%), astrocytomas (31%), and hemangioblastomas (11%). Ependymomas and hemangioblastomas disproportionately localized to the cervical cord (54% and 59%, respectively), whereas astrocytomas were distributed almost equally between the cervical cord (36%) and thoracic cord (38%). Clinical presentation, extent of functional dependence, and postoperative 30-day outcomes were largely independent of underlying tumor pathology, although tumors of the thoracic cord had worse American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) grades than cervical tumors. Rates of gross-total resection were lower for astrocytomas than for ependymomas (54% vs 84%, p < 0.01) and hemangioblastomas (54% vs 100%, p < 0.01). Additionally, 30-day readmission rates were significantly higher for astrocytomas than ependymomas (14% vs 6%, p = 0.02). Overall survival was significantly affected by the underlying pathology, with astrocytomas having poorer associated prognoses (40% at 15 years) than ependymomas (81%) and hemangioblastomas (66%; p < 0.01) and patients with high-grade ependymomas and astrocytomas having poorer long-term survival than those with low-grade lesions (p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

The neuraxial location of IMSCTs, extent of resection, and postoperative survival differed significantly across tumor pathologies. However, perioperative outcomes did not vary significantly across tumor cohorts, suggesting that operative details, rather than pathology, may have a stronger influence on the short-term clinical course, whereas pathology appears to have a stronger impact on long-term survival.

Restricted access

Aladine A. Elsamadicy, Andrew B. Koo, Benjamin C. Reeves, Zach Pennington, James Yu, C. Rory Goodwin, Luis Kolb, Maxwell Laurans, Sheng-Fu Larry Lo, John H. Shin, and Daniel M. Sciubba

OBJECTIVE

The Hospital Frailty Risk Score (HFRS) was developed utilizing ICD-10 diagnostic codes to identify frailty and predict adverse outcomes in large national databases. While other studies have examined frailty in spine oncology, the HFRS has not been assessed in this patient population. The aim of this study was to examine the association of HFRS-defined frailty with complication rates, length of stay (LOS), total cost of hospital admission, and discharge disposition in patients undergoing spine surgery for metastatic spinal column tumors.

METHODS

A retrospective cohort study was performed using the years 2016 to 2019 of the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. All adult patients (≥ 18 years old) undergoing surgical intervention for metastatic spinal column tumors were identified using the ICD-10-CM diagnostic codes and Procedural Coding System. Patients were categorized into the following three cohorts based on their HFRS: low frailty (HFRS < 5), intermediate frailty (HFRS 5–15), and high frailty (HFRS > 15). Patient demographics, comorbidities, treatment modality, perioperative complications, LOS, discharge disposition, and total cost of hospital admission were assessed. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors of prolonged LOS, nonroutine discharge, and increased cost.

RESULTS

Of the 11,480 patients identified, 7085 (61.7%) were found to have low frailty, 4160 (36.2%) had intermediate frailty, and 235 (2.0%) had high frailty according to HFRS criteria. On average, age increased along with progressively worsening frailty scores (p ≤ 0.001). The proportion of patients in each cohort who experienced ≥ 1 postoperative complication significantly increased along with increasing frailty (low frailty: 29.2%; intermediate frailty: 53.8%; high frailty: 76.6%; p < 0.001). In addition, the mean LOS (low frailty: 7.9 ± 5.0 days; intermediate frailty: 14.4 ± 13.4 days; high frailty: 24.1 ± 18.6 days; p < 0.001), rate of nonroutine discharge (low frailty: 40.4%; intermediate frailty: 60.6%; high frailty: 70.2%; p < 0.001), and mean total cost of hospital admission (low frailty: $48,603 ± $29,979; intermediate frailty: $65,271 ± $43,110; high frailty: $96,116 ± $60,815; p < 0.001) each increased along with progressing frailty. On multivariate regression analysis, intermediate and high frailty were each found to be significant predictors of both prolonged LOS (intermediate: OR 3.75 [95% CI 2.96–4.75], p < 0.001; high: OR 7.33 [95% CI 3.47–15.51]; p < 0.001) and nonroutine discharge (intermediate: OR 2.05 [95% CI 1.68–2.51], p < 0.001; high: OR 5.06 [95% CI 1.93–13.30], p = 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

This study is the first to use the HFRS to assess the impact of frailty on perioperative outcomes in patients with metastatic bony spinal tumors. Among patients with metastatic bony spinal tumors, frailty assessed using the HFRS was associated with longer hospitalizations, more nonroutine discharges, and higher total hospital costs.

Restricted access

Yike Jin, Ann Liu, Jessica R. Overbey, Ravi Medikonda, James Feghali, Sonya Krishnan, Wataru Ishida, Sutipat Pairojboriboon, Ziya L. Gokaslan, Jean-Paul Wolinsky, Nicholas Theodore, Ali Bydon, Daniel M. Sciubba, Timothy F. Witham, and Sheng-Fu L. Lo

OBJECTIVE

Treatment of primary spinal infection includes medical management with or without surgical intervention. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for the eventual need for surgery in patients with primary spinal infection on initial presentation.

METHODS

From January 2010 to July 2019, 275 patients presented with primary spinal infection. Demographic, infectious, imaging, laboratory, treatment, and outcome data were retrospectively reviewed and collected. Thirty-three patients were excluded due to insufficient follow-up (≤ 90 days) or death prior to surgery.

RESULTS

The mean age of the 242 patients was 58.8 ± 13.6 years. The majority of the patients were male (n = 130, 53.7%), White (n = 150, 62.0%), and never smokers (n = 132, 54.5%). Fifty-four patients (22.3%) were intravenous drug users. One hundred fifty-four patients (63.6%) ultimately required surgery while 88 (36.4%) never needed surgery during the duration of follow-up. There was no significant difference in age, gender, race, BMI, or comorbidities between the surgery and no-surgery groups. On univariate analysis, the presence of an epidural abscess (55.7% in the no-surgery group vs 82.5% in the surgery group, p < 0.0001), the median spinal levels involved (2 [interquartile range (IQR) 2–3] in the no-surgery group vs 3 [IQR 2–5] in the surgery group, p < 0.0001), and active bacteremia (20.5% in the no-surgery vs 35.1% in the surgery group, p = 0.02) were significantly different. The cultured organism and initial laboratory values (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, creatinine, and albumin) were not significantly different between the groups. On multivariable analysis, the final model included epidural abscess, cervical or thoracic spine involvement, and number of involved levels. After adjusting for other variables, epidural abscess (odds ratio [OR] 3.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.64–5.63), cervical or thoracic spine involvement (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.15–3.61), and increasing number of involved levels (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.01–1.35) were associated with greater odds of surgery. Fifty-two surgical patients (33.8%) underwent decompression alone while 102 (66.2%) underwent decompression with fusion. Of those who underwent decompression alone, 2 (3.8%) of 52 required subsequent fusion due to kyphosis. No patient required hardware removal due to persistent infection.

CONCLUSIONS

At time of initial presentation of primary spinal infection, the presence of epidural abscess, cervical or thoracic spine involvement, as well as an increasing number of involved spinal levels were potential risk factors for the eventual need for surgery in this study. Additional studies are needed to assess for risk factors for surgery and antibiotic treatment failure.

Free access

Andrew M. Hersh, Zach Pennington, Bethany Hung, Jaimin Patel, Earl Goldsborough, Andrew Schilling, James Feghali, Albert Antar, Siddhartha Srivastava, David Botros, Aladine A. Elsamadicy, Sheng-Fu Larry Lo, and Daniel M. Sciubba

OBJECTIVE

Frailty—the state defined by decreased physiological reserve and increased vulnerability to physiological stress—is exceedingly common in oncology patients. Given the palliative nature of spine metastasis surgery, it is imperative that patients be healthy enough to tolerate the physical insult of surgery. In the present study, the authors compared the association of two frailty metrics and the widely used Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) with postoperative morbidity in spine metastasis patients.

METHODS

A retrospective cohort of patients who underwent operations for spinal metastases at a comprehensive cancer center were identified. Data on patient demographic characteristics, disease state, medical comorbidities, operative details, and postoperative outcomes were collected. Frailty was measured with the modified 5-item frailty index (mFI-5) and metastatic spinal tumor frailty index (MSTFI). Outcomes of interest were length of stay (LOS) greater than the 75th percentile of the cohort, nonroutine discharge, and the occurrence of ≥ 1 postoperative complication.

RESULTS

In total, 322 patients were included (mean age 59.5 ± 12 years; 56.9% of patients were male). The mean ± SD LOS was 11.2 ± 9.9 days, 44.5% of patients had nonroutine discharge, and 24.0% experienced ≥ 1 postoperative complication. On multivariable analysis, increased frailty on mFI-5 and MSTFI was independently predictive of all three outcomes: prolonged LOS (OR 1.67 per point, 95% CI 1.06–2.63, p = 0.03; and OR 1.63 per point, 95% CI 1.29–2.05, p < 0.01, respectively), nonroutine discharge (OR 2.65 per point, 95% CI 1.74–4.04, p < 0.01; and OR 1.69 per point, 95% CI 1.36–2.11, p < 0.01), and ≥ 1 complication (OR 1.95 per point, 95% CI 1.23–3.09, p = 0.01; and OR 1.41 per point, 95% CI 1.12–1.77, p < 0.01). CCI was found to be independently predictive of only the occurrence of ≥ 1 postoperative complication (OR 1.45 per point, 95% CI 1.22–1.72, p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

Frailty measured with either mFI-5 or MSTFI scores was a more robust independent predictor of adverse postoperative outcomes than the more widely used CCI. Both mFI-5 and MSTFI were significantly associated with prolonged LOS, higher complication rates, and nonroutine discharge. Further investigation in a prospective multicenter cohort is merited.

Free access

Bethany Hung, Zach Pennington, Andrew M. Hersh, Andrew Schilling, Jeff Ehresman, Jaimin Patel, Albert Antar, Jose L. Porras, Aladine A. Elsamadicy, and Daniel M. Sciubba

OBJECTIVE

Previous studies have suggested the possibility of racial disparities in surgical outcomes for patients undergoing spine surgery, although this has not been thoroughly investigated in those with spinal metastases. Given the increasing prevalence of spinal metastases requiring intervention, knowledge about potential discrepancies in outcomes would benefit overall patient care. The objective in the present study was to investigate whether race was an independent predictor of postoperative complications, nonroutine discharge, and prolonged length of stay (LOS) after surgery for spinal metastasis.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively examined patients at a single comprehensive cancer center who had undergone surgery for spinal metastasis between April 2013 and April 2020. Demographic information, primary pathology, preoperative clinical characteristics, and operative outcomes were collected. Factors achieving p values < 0.15 on univariate regression were entered into a stepwise multivariable logistic regression to generate predictive models. Nonroutine discharge was defined as a nonhome discharge destination and prolonged LOS was defined as LOS greater than the 75th percentile for the entire cohort.

RESULTS

Three hundred twenty-eight patients who had undergone 348 operations were included: 240 (69.0%) White and 108 (31.0%) Black. On univariable analysis, cohorts significantly differed in age (p = 0.02), marital status (p < 0.001), insurance status (p = 0.03), income quartile (p = 0.02), primary tumor type (p = 0.04), and preoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) score (p < 0.001). On multivariable analysis, race was an independent predictor for nonroutine discharge: Black patients had significantly higher odds of nonroutine discharge than White patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28–3.92, p = 0.005). Older age (AOR 1.06 per year, 95% CI 1.03–1.09, p < 0.001), preoperative KPS score ≤ 70 (AOR 3.30, 95% CI 1.93–5.65, p < 0.001), preoperative Frankel grade A–C (AOR 3.48, 95% CI 1.17–10.3, p = 0.02), insurance status (p = 0.005), being unmarried (AOR 0.58, 95% CI 0.35–0.97, p = 0.04), number of levels (AOR 1.17 per level, 95% CI 1.05–1.31, p = 0.004), and thoracic involvement (AOR 1.71, 95% CI 1.02–2.88, p = 0.04) were also predictive of nonroutine discharge. However, race was not independently predictive of postoperative complications or prolonged LOS. Higher Charlson Comorbidity Index (AOR 1.22 per point, 95% CI 1.04–1.43, p = 0.01), low preoperative KPS score (AOR 1.84, 95% CI 1.16–2.92, p = 0.01), and number of levels (AOR 1.15 per level, 95% CI 1.05–1.27, p = 0.004) were predictive of complications, while insurance status (p = 0.05), income quartile (p = 0.01), low preoperative KPS score (AOR 1.64, 95% CI 1.03–2.72, p = 0.05), and number of levels (AOR 1.16 per level, 95% CI 1.05–1.30, p = 0.004) were predictive of prolonged LOS.

CONCLUSIONS

Race, insurance status, age, baseline functional status, and marital status were all independently associated with nonroutine discharge. This suggests that a combination of socioeconomic factors and functional status, rather than medical comorbidities, may best predict postdischarge disposition in patients treated for spinal metastases. Further investigation in a prospective cohort is merited.

Free access

Ann Liu, Yike Jin, Ethan Cottrill, Majid Khan, Erick Westbroek, Jeff Ehresman, Zach Pennington, Sheng-fu L. Lo, Daniel M. Sciubba, Camilo A. Molina, and Timothy F. Witham

OBJECTIVE

Augmented reality (AR) is a novel technology which, when applied to spine surgery, offers the potential for efficient, safe, and accurate placement of spinal instrumentation. The authors report the accuracy of the first 205 pedicle screws consecutively placed at their institution by using AR assistance with a unique head-mounted display (HMD) navigation system.

METHODS

A retrospective review was performed of the first 28 consecutive patients who underwent AR-assisted pedicle screw placement in the thoracic, lumbar, and/or sacral spine at the authors’ institution. Clinical accuracy for each pedicle screw was graded using the Gertzbein-Robbins scale by an independent neuroradiologist working in a blinded fashion.

RESULTS

Twenty-eight consecutive patients underwent thoracic, lumbar, or sacral pedicle screw placement with AR assistance. The median age at the time of surgery was 62.5 (IQR 13.8) years and the median body mass index was 31 (IQR 8.6) kg/m2. Indications for surgery included degenerative disease (n = 12, 43%); deformity correction (n = 12, 43%); tumor (n = 3, 11%); and trauma (n = 1, 4%). The majority of patients (n = 26, 93%) presented with low-back pain, 19 (68%) patients presented with radicular leg pain, and 10 (36%) patients had documented lower extremity weakness. A total of 205 screws were consecutively placed, with 112 (55%) placed in the lumbar spine, 67 (33%) in the thoracic spine, and 26 (13%) at S1. Screw placement accuracy was 98.5% for thoracic screws, 97.8% for lumbar/S1 screws, and 98.0% overall.

CONCLUSIONS

AR depicted through a unique HMD is a novel and clinically accurate technology for the navigated insertion of pedicle screws. The authors describe the first 205 AR-assisted thoracic, lumbar, and sacral pedicle screws consecutively placed at their institution with an accuracy of 98.0% as determined by a Gertzbein-Robbins grade of A or B.

Free access

Dean Chou, Virginie Lafage, Alvin Y. Chan, Peter Passias, Gregory M. Mundis Jr., Robert K. Eastlack, Kai-Ming Fu, Richard G. Fessler, Munish C. Gupta, Khoi D. Than, Neel Anand, Juan S. Uribe, Adam S. Kanter, David O. Okonkwo, Shay Bess, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Han Jo Kim, Justin S. Smith, Daniel M. Sciubba, Paul Park, Praveen V. Mummaneni, and

OBJECTIVE

Circumferential minimally invasive spine surgery (cMIS) for adult scoliosis has become more advanced and powerful, but direct comparison with traditional open correction using prospectively collected data is limited. The authors performed a retrospective review of prospectively collected, multicenter adult spinal deformity data. The authors directly compared cMIS for adult scoliosis with open correction in propensity-matched cohorts using health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) measures and surgical parameters.

METHODS

Data from a prospective, multicenter adult spinal deformity database were retrospectively reviewed. Inclusion criteria were age > 18 years, minimum 1-year follow-up, and one of the following characteristics: pelvic tilt (PT) > 25°, pelvic incidence minus lumbar lordosis (PI-LL) > 10°, Cobb angle > 20°, or sagittal vertical axis (SVA) > 5 cm. Patients were categorized as undergoing cMIS (percutaneous screws with minimally invasive anterior interbody fusion) or open correction (traditional open deformity correction). Propensity matching was used to create two equal groups and to control for age, BMI, preoperative PI-LL, pelvic incidence (PI), T1 pelvic angle (T1PA), SVA, PT, and number of posterior levels fused.

RESULTS

A total of 154 patients (77 underwent open procedures and 77 underwent cMIS) were included after matching for age, BMI, PI-LL (mean 15° vs 17°, respectively), PI (54° vs 54°), T1PA (21° vs 22°), and mean number of levels fused (6.3 vs 6). Patients who underwent three-column osteotomy were excluded. Follow-up was 1 year for all patients. Postoperative Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) (p = 0.50), Scoliosis Research Society–total (p = 0.45), and EQ-5D (p = 0.33) scores were not different between cMIS and open patients. Maximum Cobb angles were similar for open and cMIS patients at baseline (25.9° vs 26.3°, p = 0.85) and at 1 year postoperation (15.0° vs 17.5°, p = 0.17). In total, 58.3% of open patients and 64.4% of cMIS patients (p = 0.31) reached the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in ODI at 1 year. At 1 year, no differences were observed in terms of PI-LL (p = 0.71), SVA (p = 0.46), PT (p = 0.9), or Cobb angle (p = 0.20). Open patients had greater estimated blood loss compared with cMIS patients (1.36 L vs 0.524 L, p < 0.05) and fewer levels of interbody fusion (1.87 vs 3.46, p < 0.05), but shorter operative times (356 minutes vs 452 minutes, p = 0.003). Revision surgery rates between the two cohorts were similar (p = 0.97).

CONCLUSIONS

When cMIS was compared with open adult scoliosis correction with propensity matching, HRQOL improvement, spinopelvic parameters, revision surgery rates, and proportions of patients who reached MCID were similar between cohorts. However, well-selected cMIS patients had less blood loss, comparable results, and longer operative times in comparison with open patients.

Free access

Dean Chou, Virginie Lafage, Alvin Y. Chan, Peter Passias, Gregory M. Mundis Jr., Robert K. Eastlack, Kai-Ming Fu, Richard G. Fessler, Munish C. Gupta, Khoi D. Than, Neel Anand, Juan S. Uribe, Adam S. Kanter, David O. Okonkwo, Shay Bess, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Han Jo Kim, Justin S. Smith, Daniel M. Sciubba, Paul Park, Praveen V. Mummaneni, and the International Spine Study Group (ISSG)

OBJECTIVE

Circumferential minimally invasive spine surgery (cMIS) for adult scoliosis has become more advanced and powerful, but direct comparison with traditional open correction using prospectively collected data is limited. The authors performed a retrospective review of prospectively collected, multicenter adult spinal deformity data. The authors directly compared cMIS for adult scoliosis with open correction in propensity-matched cohorts using health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) measures and surgical parameters.

METHODS

Data from a prospective, multicenter adult spinal deformity database were retrospectively reviewed. Inclusion criteria were age > 18 years, minimum 1-year follow-up, and one of the following characteristics: pelvic tilt (PT) > 25°, pelvic incidence minus lumbar lordosis (PI-LL) > 10°, Cobb angle > 20°, or sagittal vertical axis (SVA) > 5 cm. Patients were categorized as undergoing cMIS (percutaneous screws with minimally invasive anterior interbody fusion) or open correction (traditional open deformity correction). Propensity matching was used to create two equal groups and to control for age, BMI, preoperative PI-LL, pelvic incidence (PI), T1 pelvic angle (T1PA), SVA, PT, and number of posterior levels fused.

RESULTS

A total of 154 patients (77 underwent open procedures and 77 underwent cMIS) were included after matching for age, BMI, PI-LL (mean 15° vs 17°, respectively), PI (54° vs 54°), T1PA (21° vs 22°), and mean number of levels fused (6.3 vs 6). Patients who underwent three-column osteotomy were excluded. Follow-up was 1 year for all patients. Postoperative Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) (p = 0.50), Scoliosis Research Society–total (p = 0.45), and EQ-5D (p = 0.33) scores were not different between cMIS and open patients. Maximum Cobb angles were similar for open and cMIS patients at baseline (25.9° vs 26.3°, p = 0.85) and at 1 year postoperation (15.0° vs 17.5°, p = 0.17). In total, 58.3% of open patients and 64.4% of cMIS patients (p = 0.31) reached the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in ODI at 1 year. At 1 year, no differences were observed in terms of PI-LL (p = 0.71), SVA (p = 0.46), PT (p = 0.9), or Cobb angle (p = 0.20). Open patients had greater estimated blood loss compared with cMIS patients (1.36 L vs 0.524 L, p < 0.05) and fewer levels of interbody fusion (1.87 vs 3.46, p < 0.05), but shorter operative times (356 minutes vs 452 minutes, p = 0.003). Revision surgery rates between the two cohorts were similar (p = 0.97).

CONCLUSIONS

When cMIS was compared with open adult scoliosis correction with propensity matching, HRQOL improvement, spinopelvic parameters, revision surgery rates, and proportions of patients who reached MCID were similar between cohorts. However, well-selected cMIS patients had less blood loss, comparable results, and longer operative times in comparison with open patients.