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A Large Aneurysm of the Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery in a 1-Year-Old Child

John A. Jane

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An Investigation Concerning the Restitution of Motor Function Following Injury to the Spinal Cord

John A. Jane, Joseph P. Evans, and Lester E. Fisher

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Assessment of the Natural History of Anterior Communicating Aneurysms

Alan E. Richardson, John A. Jane, and Peter M. Payne

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The Prediction of Morbidity and Mortality in Anterior Communicating Aneurysms Treated by Proximal Anterior Cerebral Ligation

Alan E. Richardson, John A. Jane, and Peter M. Payne

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The Contribution of the Precentral Gyrus to the Pyramidal Tract of Man

John A. Jane, David Yashon, William DeMyer, and Paul C. Bucy

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The Effect of Destruction of the Corticospinal Tract in the Human Cerebral Peduncle Upon Motor Function and Involuntary Movements

Report of 11 Cases

John A. Jane, David Yashon, Donald P. Becker, R. Beatty, and O. Sugar

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An Inquiry into the Neurophysiological Basis for Pain

Donald P. Becker, Henry Gluck, Frank E. Nulsen, and John A. Jane

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Nocardia Asteroides Brain Abscess Successfully Treated by Enucleation

Case Report

Martin H. Weiss and John A. Jane

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Prognosis and Management of Spinal Cord and Cauda Equina Bullet Injuries in Sixty-Five Civilians

David Yashon, John A. Jane, and Robert J. White

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Experimental study of irreversible shock and the brain

Patrick F. Golden and John A. Jane

✓ The roles of various organ systems in preventing the phenomenon of irreversible hemorrhagic shock were studied in dogs by artificially maintaining or depriving these systems of circulation. It was found that depriving the abdominal viscera of circulation did not necessarily result in death if the heart and brain were perfused. If the heart was maintained at normal pressures while the rest of the body was subjected to what would have otherwise been a lethal period of shock, the animal nevertheless survived. Thus, in the standard “35 mm Hg shock model” the heart seemed to be crucial. However, in the “30 mm Hg shock model” death occurred even if the heart was adequately perfused, indicating that failure of neural mechanisms accounts for irreversibility at these levels of hypotension.