Meralgia paresthetica treated by injection, decompression, and neurectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis of pain and operative outcomes

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  • 1 Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida; and
  • 2 Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
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OBJECTIVE

Meralgia paresthetica is caused by entrapment of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) and often presents with pain. Multiple treatment options targeting the LFCN can be pursued to treat the pain should conservative measures fail, with the most common options being injection, neurolysis, and neurectomy. However, their efficacy in causing pain relief and their clinical outcomes have yet to be directly compared. The aim of this study was to interrogate the contemporary literature and quantitatively define how these options compare.

METHODS

The electronic databases Ovid Embase, PubMed, SCOPUS, and the Cochrane Library were interrogated from inception to May 2020 following the PRISMA guidelines. Candidate articles were screened against prespecified criteria. Outcome data were abstracted and pooled by random-effects meta-analysis of proportions.

RESULTS

There were 25 articles that satisfied all criteria, reporting outcomes for a total of 670 meralgia paresthetica patients, with 78 (12%) treated by injection, 496 (74%) by neurolysis, and 96 (14%) by neurectomy. The incidence of complete pain relief was 85% (95% CI 71%–96%) after neurectomy, 63% (95% CI 56%–71%) after neurolysis, and 22% (95% CI 13%–33%) after injection, which were all statistically different (p < 0.01). The incidence of revision procedures was 12% (95% CI 4%–22%) after neurolysis and 0% (95% CI 0%–2%) after neurectomy, which were significantly lower than 81% (95% CI 64%–94%) after injection (p < 0.01). The incidences of treatment complications were statistically comparable across all three treatments, ranging from 0% to 5% (p = 0.34).

CONCLUSIONS

There are multiple treatment options to target pain in meralgia paresthetica. The incidence of complete pain relief appears to be the greatest among the 3 interventions after neurectomy, accompanied by the lowest incidence of revision procedures. These findings should help inform patient preference and expectations. Greater exploration of the anatomical rationale for incomplete pain relief after surgical intervention will assist in optimizing further surgical treatment for meralgia paresthetica.

ABBREVIATIONS ASIS = anterior superior iliac spine; GRADE = Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation; LFCN = lateral femoral cutaneous nerve; MOOSE = Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology; PICOS = Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome, Study type; PRISMA = Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Tables and Figures (PDF 607 KB)

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Contributor Notes

Correspondence Victor M. Lu: University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL. victor.lu@jhsmiami.org.

INCLUDE WHEN CITING Published online January 15, 2021; DOI: 10.3171/2020.7.JNS202191.

Disclosures Dr. Levi: grant support from the Department of Defense.

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