Dynamic pressure-flow relationships of brain blood flow in the monkey

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✓ Pressure-flow data are presented for the brain vascular bed in the rhesus monkey. These data are obtained at fixed levels of vasomotor tone. Resultant flow curves are called the “dynamic pressure-flow relationships” (DPFR). In the experimental model, arterial pressures are oscillated with a sinusoidal pump at frequencies exceeding the vasomotor response lag time. The resultant DPFR curves are discussed. A model is presented to show that changes in vasomotor tone cause a vertical shift of the DPFR. Changes in vascular bed resistance cause a change in the slope of the DPFR (▵P/▵F).

Article Information

Address reprint requests to: William E. Hunt, M.D., Division of Neurological Surgery, The Ohio State University Hospital, 410 West 10th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210.

© AANS, except where prohibited by US copyright law.

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Figures

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    Relationship of cortical blood flow to changes in mean arterial pressure, with a pCO2 of 70 mm Hg. Complete vasomotor relaxation has occurred and the flow varies linearly with pressure. (From Harper AM: Physiology of cerebral blood flow. Brit J Anaesth 37: 225–235, 1965.)

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    Dynamic pressure-flow relationships (DPFR) in the internal carotid artery of the rhesus monkey. Each set of data is obtained within a 4-second cycle of aortic pressure oscillation. The central operating point representing mean arterial pressure for the complete cycle is shown for each DPFR. All data points are shown where clarity permits. Regression lines are determined by the method of the least squares.

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    Dynamic pressure-flow relationships in the internal carotid artery of another rhesus monkey. Only the regression lines fitting pressure-flow data (DPFR) are shown. Data points are omitted for clarity. Central operating points are shown for each condition.

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    Combined data, 11 experiments in eight animals. The DPFR and central operating point are shown for each experimental condition.

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    Effect of varying transmural pressure and resistance on pressure-flow curves. See text for description of model. The ordinate Pa is the perfusion pressure, and the abscissa F is the blood flow.

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    Photograph of the chronic restraining chair in which 11 animals were placed after exteriorization of instrument and catheter leads. Experimental data were determined in awake unanesthetized animals while in this chair.

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