Exanopic Central Scotoma, a Pitfall in Diagnosis

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Ordinarily, amblyopia exanopsia is associated with strabismus. However, it may occur in patients who are not obviously cross-eyed. In either event, the loss of vision in one eye is associated with a central scotoma. In neurologic diagnosis a central scotoma in the field of vision of one eye usually indicates involvement of the optic nerve itself. Hence, a central scotoma that is really due to amblyopia exanopsia may prove to be misleading. Since this situation is not generally recognized, and especially since it is not mentioned in the authoritative work on perimetry by Traquair,2 it is

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1.

PeterL. C. The extra-ocular muscles. A clinical study of normal and abnormal ocular motility. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger19413rd ed.368 pp.Peter L. C. The extra-ocular muscles. A clinical study of normal and abnormal ocular motility. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger 1941 3rd ed. 368 pp.

2.

TraquairH. M. An introduction to clinical perimetry. London: Henry Kimpton19424th ed.Traquair H. M. An introduction to clinical perimetry. London: Henry Kimpton 1942 4th ed.

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