Efficacy of prophylactic versus therapeutic administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 on the acute neurochemical response to a concussion in a rat model combining force and rotation

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  • 1 Research Center, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal; and
  • | 2 Research Center, Douglas Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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OBJECTIVE

Alterations in amino acid concentrations are a major contributor to the persistent neurological and behavioral effects induced by concussions and mild traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). Glutamate, the most abundant excitatory amino acid in the CNS, has a major role in the pathophysiological process of concussion. The indiscriminate liberation of glutamate immediately after a concussion triggers an excitotoxic response that leads to cell death, neuronal damage, and the dysfunction of surviving neurons, largely by overactivation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamatergic receptors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of prophylactic versus therapeutic administration of MK-801, a promising NMDA receptor antagonist, on the acute changes in amino acid extracellular concentrations involved in excitotoxicity resulting from a concussive trauma.

METHODS

The immediate neurochemical response to a concussion cannot be characterized in humans. Therefore, the authors used their previously validated combination of a weight-drop concussion rat model and in vivo cerebral microdialysis. The microdialysis probe was inserted inside the hippocampus and left inserted at impact to allow uninterrupted sampling of amino acids of interest immediately after concussion. The primary outcome included amino acid concentrations and the secondary outcome included righting time. Samples were taken in 10-minute increments for 60 minutes before, during, and 60 minutes after impact, and analyzed for glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, taurine, glycine, glutamine, and serine using high-performance liquid chromatography. Righting time was acquired as a neurological restoration indicator. Physiological saline or 10 mg/kg MK-801 was administrated intraperitoneally 60 minutes before or immediately following induction of sham injury or concussion.

RESULTS

Following induction of concussion, glutamate, taurine, and glycine levels as well as righting times in cases from the MK-801 treatment group were comparable to those of vehicle-treated animals. In contrast, righting times and amino acid concentrations observed within the first 10 minutes after induction of concussion in cases assigned to the MK-801 prophylaxis group were comparable to those of sham-injured animals.

CONCLUSIONS

These results suggest that presynaptic actions and peak availability of MK-801 following prophylactic administration significantly inhibit the immediate and indiscriminate release of glutamate, taurine, and glycine in extracellular fluid after a concussion.

ABBREVIATIONS

ECF = extracellular fluid; GABA = gamma-aminobutyric acid; HSD = honest significant difference; IP = intraperitoneal; NMDA = N-methyl-d-aspartate; TBI = traumatic brain injury.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Figs. 1-5 (PDF 35,113 KB)

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