Pain-free and pain-controlled survival after sectioning the nervus intermedius in nervus intermedius neuralgia: a single-institution review

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OBJECTIVE

Nervus intermedius neuralgia (NIN) or geniculate neuralgia is a rare facial pain condition consisting of sharp, lancinating pain deep in the ear and can occur alongside trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Studies on the clinical presentation, intraoperative findings, and ultimately postoperative outcomes are extremely limited. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical presentation and surgical findings, and determine pain-free survival after sectioning of the nervus intermedius (NI).

METHODS

The authors conducted a retrospective chart review and survey of patients who were diagnosed with NIN at one institution and who underwent neurosurgical interventions. Pain-free survival was determined through chart review and phone interviews using a modified facial pain and quality of life questionnaire and represented as Kaplan-Meier curves.

RESULTS

The authors found 15 patients with NIN who underwent microsurgical intervention performed by two surgeons from 2002 to 2016 at a single institution. Fourteen of these patients underwent sectioning of the NI, and 8 of 14 had concomitant TN. Five patients had visible neurovascular compression (NVC) of the NI by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery in most cases where NVC was found. The most common postoperative complaints were dizziness and vertigo, diplopia, ear fullness, tinnitus, and temporary facial nerve palsy. Thirteen of the 14 patients reportedly experienced pain relief immediately after surgery. The mean length of follow-up was 6.41 years (range 8 months to 14.5 years). Overall recurrence of any pain was 42% (6 of 14), and 4 patients (isolated NIN that received NI sectioning alone) reported their pain was the same or worse than before surgery at longest follow-up. The median pain-free survival was 4.82 years ± 14.85 months. The median pain-controlled survival was 6.22 years ± 15.78 months.

CONCLUSIONS

In this retrospective review, sectioning of the NI produced no major complications, such as permanent facial weakness or deafness, and was effective for patients when performed in addition to other procedures. After sectioning of the NI, patients experienced 4.8 years pain free and experienced 6.2 years of less pain than before surgery. Alone, sectioning of the NI was not effective. The pathophysiology of NIN is not entirely understood. It appears that neurovascular compression plays only a minor role in the syndrome and there is a high degree of overlap with TN.

ABBREVIATIONS AICA = anterior inferior cerebellar artery; BNI = Barrow Neurological Institute; BPI-Facial = Brief Pain Inventory–Facial instrument; CN = cranial nerve; GN = glossopharyngeal neuralgia; MVC = microvascular decompression; NI = nervus intermedius; NIN = NI neuralgia; NVC = neurovascular compression; PICA = posterior inferior cerebellar artery; QOL = quality of life; TN = trigeminal neuralgia.

Article Information

Correspondence Kim J. Burchiel: Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR. burchiek@ohsu.edu.

INCLUDE WHEN CITING Published online August 17, 2018; DOI: 10.3171/2018.3.JNS172495.

Disclosures Dr. Raslan reports being a consultant for Abbott.

© AANS, except where prohibited by US copyright law.

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Figures

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    Flow diagram of patient selection.

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    Pain-free and pain-controlled survival for 13 patients with NIN who underwent sectioning of the NI.

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