Pure arterial malformation of the posterior cerebral artery: importance of its recognition

Case report

Nancy McLaughlin Departments of Neurosurgery and

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Radoslav Raychev Radiology, Neurointerventional Radiology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California

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Gary Duckwiler Radiology, Neurointerventional Radiology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California

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Neil A. Martin Departments of Neurosurgery and

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The finding of dilated, elongated, and tortuous vessels on brain imaging should prompt clinicians to determine what vascular anomaly is present. Importantly, not all suspicious serpentine flow voids are manifestations of arteriovenous malformations or arteriovenous fistulas. Other types of intracranial vasculopathies should also be considered. The authors report a rare case of dilated, tortuous, and redundant left posterior communicating artery and left P2 segment of the posterior cerebral artery identified in a young healthy adult that remained stable over a 30-year period. Dynamic and 3D images were critical for determining the type of vascular anomaly and for guiding appropriate management. The authors propose that this case represents a pure arterial malformation and discuss its distinguishing features.

Abbreviations used in this paper:

ACA = anterior cerebral artery; CTA = CT angiography; ICA= internal carotid artery; MRA = MR angiography; PCA = posterior cerebral artery; PCoA = posterior communicating artery.
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