Letter to the Editor: Obsessive-compulsive disorder and cingulotomy

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To The Editor: We read with interest the article by Sheth et al.5 (Sheth SA, Neal J, Tangherlini F, et al: Limbic system surgery for treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder: a prospective long-term follow-up of 64 patients. Clinical article. J Neurosurg 118:491–497, March 2013). The authors published their results with anterior cingulotomy (cingulomotomy) for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) with a long-term follow-up. Their results have been very good and comparable to those of other major studies. In this context, we would like to share the work done by Prof. V. Balasubramaniam at the

To The Editor: We read with interest the article by Sheth et al.5 (Sheth SA, Neal J, Tangherlini F, et al: Limbic system surgery for treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder: a prospective long-term follow-up of 64 patients. Clinical article. J Neurosurg 118:491–497, March 2013). The authors published their results with anterior cingulotomy (cingulomotomy) for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) with a long-term follow-up. Their results have been very good and comparable to those of other major studies. In this context, we would like to share the work done by Prof. V. Balasubramaniam at the Madras Institute of Neurology in Chennai, India.1–4 Stereotactic cingulotomy has been performed at the institute since 1972 for OCD and other disorders, including drug addiction. In the pre-MRI era, angiography and ventriculography were used. The target in the cingulum was localized to the area between pericallosal and callosomarginal arteries. The Madras Institute of Neurology has the largest series of cases of drug addiction treated with stereotactic cingulotomy.

Disclosure

The authors report no conflict of interest.

References

Response

We thank the authors for their thoughtful comments regarding our paper. Functional neurosurgery continues to provide novel therapeutic options for patients with otherwise intractable medical and psychiatric conditions. As always, the enthusiasm for these procedures must be tempered with a cautious and ethical approach to patient selection and treatment.

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Article Information

Please include this information when citing this paper: published online June 7, 2013; DOI: 10.3171/2013.3.JNS13523.

© AANS, except where prohibited by US copyright law.

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References

1

Balasubramaniam V: Magnetic resonance image-guided stereotactic cingulotomy for intractable psychiatric disease. Neurosurgery 40:110711081997. (Letter)

2

Balasubramaniam V: Vistas in stereotaxic surgery. Neurol India 34:2252401986

3

Balasubramaniam VChidambaram B: Stereotaxic cingulomotomy: second look. Neurol India 38:5595621990

4

Balasubramaniam VKanaka TSRamanujam PB: Stereotaxic cingulomotomy for drug addiction. Neurol India 21:63661973

5

Sheth SANeal JTangherlini FMian MKGentil ACosgrove GR: Limbic system surgery for treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder: a prospective long-term follow-up of 64 patients. Clinical article. J Neurosurg 118:4914972013

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